Vision Therapy

Good vision requires your eyesight, visual pathways, and brain to all work together. When they don’t, even a person with 20/20 eyesight can experience difficulty reading, writing, and processing information.Here we will provide you with a complete overview of what we do here at the Vision Therapy Center.

Definition of Vision Therapy

Vision therapy helps the patient develop the visual skills necessary for good vision. Optical devices and exercises are used to improve the eye-brain connection in order to make eye movements easier and more efficient. The patient learns how to correctly process the visual information that the brain receives from the eyes.

Vision therapy can range from one session to 2-3 months and involves office visits combined with at-home activities.

Who needs Vision Therapy?

Patients who require vision therapy generally have the following visual challenges:

  • Learning-related visual problems: Conditions such as poor eye teaming, focusing, tracking and visualization skills can all negatively affect learning.
  • Crossed Eye (Strabismus) or Lazy Eye (Amblyopia):Crossed eyes and or lazy eyes can be treated with Vision Therapy instead of conventional surgery, glasses or patching. Vision Therapy is very effective for these conditions at an early age, but can yield results for patients of any age.
  • Stress-induced vision problems: Our high-tech society requires many people to do a large volume of near work in front of a computer screen. Because of this, there is an increasing number of patients that experience eyestrain, headaches and other visual related difficulties.
  • Visual rehabilitation for special populations (strokes, brain injuries, developmental delays, multiple sclerosis, etc.): A neurological disorder or trauma to the nervous system can affect a person’s vision. This includes people who have traumatic brain injuries, strokes, whiplash, developmental delays, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and other neurological ailments.
  • Sports vision improvement: Even good vision can become better. Athletes often use Vision Therapy to improve eye-hand coordination, visual reaction time, peripheral awareness, eye teaming, focusing, tracking and visualization skills.

What Outcomes can You Expect from Vision Therapy?

When the eyes move, align, fixate and focus together, a whole new world of vision is discovered. With successful treatment, our patients may find that:

  • Learning becomes easier
  • Reading level and speed increases
  • Time spent on homework decreases
  • The ability to follow moving objects (a ball, a car) improves
  • Seeing objects nearby or at a distance improves
  • Visualizing mental images becomes easier

The rate at which patients experience these improvements will vary, but generally progress is seen early in the therapy programme

Vision Therapy can help in following conditions

  • Amblyopia / lazy Eye
    Amblyopia / lazy Eye
  • Strabismus / Squint
    Strabismus / Squint
  • Learning-Related Vision Problems
    Learning-Related Vision Problems
  • Computer vision syndrome
    Computer vision syndrome
  • What is Sports Vision Training?
    What is Sports Vision Training?
  • Focusing Problems
    Focusing Problems
  • Diplopia, or double vision
    Diplopia, or double vision
  • Brain Injury
    Brain Injury
  • Nystagmus
    Nystagmus
  • Headache
    Headache
  • Myopia Control
    Myopia Control
  • Autism and developmental delay
    Autism and developmental delay
  • Vision Stimulation
    Vision Stimulation
Amblyopia / lazy Eye

Amblyopia is a neuro-developmental disorder of binocular vision and is the most common form of reversible blindness. The condition of amblyopia results in a loss of visual function involving reduced eyesight in one eye, loss of depth perception, delays in visual information processing, and visual-motor coordination. Left untreated, amblyopia can affect a child’s self- image, work, school, and friendships and may also lead towards depression.

Strabismus / Squint

Strabismus, or crossed eyes, is the inability to point both eyes in the same direction at the same time. One eye may appear to turn in (esotropia), out (exotropia), up (hypertropia), or down (hypotropia). The eye turn may occur constantly or only intermittently. Eye-turning may change from one eye to the other, and may only appear when a person is tired or has done a lot of reading. Strabismus may cause double vision. To avoid seeing double, vision in one eye may be ignored resulting in a lazy eye (amblyopia).

Learning-Related Vision Problems

Skills needed for learning are focusing coordinating tracking.we help them to develop all these visual skills,with vision therapy .improving these skills helps children with learning disabilities like dyslexia ,ADD,ADHD to perform better.

Computer vision syndrome

Many individuals experience eye discomfort and vision problems when viewing digital screens for extended periods. The level of discomfort appears to increase with the amount of digital screen use.

What is Sports Vision Training?

Sports vision training works on improving the visual abilities like  eye-hand coordination, dynamic visual acuity, tracking, focusing, visual reaction time, and peripheral vision. All activities are done on a sport specific basis with a custom tailored program for each sport and athlete. If you are having trouble  to getting the next level in your particular sport even after stepping up your practice, you might have a visual problem limiting your success

Focusing Problems

Our eyes have an automatic focusing system which adjusts the lens inside our eye in order to see clearly at all distances.  If there is a problem in how easily or quickly our eyes focus, that visual problem is called an accommodative dysfunction.

Diplopia, or double vision

Diplopia, or double vision, can result if our eyes do not both aim in the same place either at a distance or up close. The double images may be totally separate or overlap to some degree. Double vision can develop over time or appear suddenly.”

Brain Injury

Approximately 80% of patients that suffer from a traumatic brain injury are struggling with vision deficits which are a direct result of their injury.with the help of vision therapy or visual stimulation we can improve the visual field ,vision

Nystagmus

Nystagmus most commonly causes the eyes to look involuntarily from side to side in a rapid, swinging motion rather than staying fixed on an object or person. Some nystagmuses, however, cause the eyes to jerk sideways or up and down.

Headache

If you’re suffering from frequent headaches, ask yourself, “When was my last eye checkup?” A routine eye exam can turn up a variety of issues that may be causing headaches. In some cases staring at the computer screen too long, or working on overly bright or dim light may be the culprit. Adjusting workplace lighting, or remembering to take a break every hour or so to give your eyes a rest can remedy those problems.

Myopia Control

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is the inability to see objects at a distance clearly. Myopia usually develops in childhood and may progress into the early adult years.This progression of myopia can be controlled with our programme. Risk factors for the development of myopia include a family history of nearsightedness, visual stress from close work, or using a computer.

Autism and developmental delay

A child with an autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy or pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) may also suffer from a developmental delay within their vision abilities. At Vision Therapy, we treat developmentally delayed children and progress their vision and visually integrated sensory skills. As a result, our patients’ experience an increase in their learning abilities, an increase in their abilities to perform day-to-day tasks and they respond more effectively during other rehabilitative services.

Vision Stimulation

Each of the five senses is a doorway to your baby’s mind. Your newborn baby can hear your voice, feel your touch, smell your scent, and taste anything you put in his mouth. While baby’s vision may be one of the least developed senses at birth, visual input during the early months may have the most profound effect on baby’s developing nervous system. What exactly does this mean? Why is visual stimulation so important for a baby? How can you as a parent or caregiver best stimulate your newborn’s visual senses?